Kangu

02/10/17

Kangu (12 RP)
Medium Humanoid (kangu)

Racial Traits

  • +2 Dexterity, -2 Intelligent or Wisdom (0 RP)
  • Humanoid: Kangu are humanoid with the Kangu subtype. (0 RP)
  • Medium size: Kangu are medium so have no bonuses or penalties due to their size. (0 RP)
  • Standard Speed: Kangu have a base speed of 30 feet (0 RP)
  • Lowlight vision: Kangu can see twice as far as a race with normal vision in conditions of dim light. (1 RP)
  • Keen Senses: A Kangu skittish heritage grants them Alertness as a racial feat (+4 Perception). (2 RP)
  • Expert Leaper: When making jump checks, Kangu are always considered to have a running start. Also, when they deliberately fall, a DC 15 Acrobatics check allows them to ignore the first 20 feet fallen, instead of the first 10 feet. (2 RP)
  • Tail Attack: Kangu have a long, muscular tail. This gives them the ability to give a painful slap for 1d6 + Strength modifier bludgeoning damage and gain the Weapon Focus feat with this Unarmed Attack. They gain no penalty by making this attack do subdual damage and are able to take trip attack as a feat. (3 RP)
  • Thick Skin: Kangu have a thick hide, so gain a +1 Natural Armor bonus. (2 RP)
  • Fleet Footed: Kangu receive Run as a bonus feat and a +2 racial bonus on initiative checks. (2 RP)
  • Language Kangan and Common. Bonus: Elven, Gnome and Sylvan.(0 RP)

Alternate Racial Traits

  • Feet of Fury (Ex) The large, powerful feet of a Kangu make effective weapons. All Kangu automatically receive the martial artist (unarmed attacks, 1d6) and weapon finesse (kick) feats and a +4 racial bonus to Jump checks. Replaces tail attack.
  • Healthy: Kangu gain a +4 bonus on Fortitude saves against disease and poison, including magical diseases. Replaces thick skin.
  • Sociable: When Kangu attempt to change a creature’s attitude with a Diplomacy check and fail by 5 or more, they can try to influence the creature a second time even if 24 hours have not passed. Replaces lowlight vision.
  • Beguiling Liar: Kangu gain a +4 racial bonus on Bluff checks to convince an opponent that what they are saying is true when they tell a lie. Replaces fleet footed or healthy.
  • Plains Runner: Kangu love to run, so gain a +4 to Constitution checks during a forced march. Replaces healthy.

Kangu live on Animus, mostly in valleys protected from most predators. They have a tribal society similar to the Aborigines of Australia. They Kangu are a humanoid kangaroo; they are cousins to the Lepi. They evolved in rainforests, but left their protection to begin a hunter-gatherer existence on the plains.
Kangu were once high-strung herbivores with a, “hair-trigger” fight or flight instinct that favored flight. They developed sensitive ears and sharp eyes to more easily escape predators. Whether it was from lack of food, population or predatory pressure, no one knows. They are now omnivores and excel in the martial arts. Because of their muscular legs similar to a kangaroo, they are great leapers and use them in their natural kick attacks.
Kangu fur comes mostly in shades of gray and brown, but other colors are known. They are very prolific, twins are common and have few enemies. They are marsupials, like kangaroos.

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12 Proven Health Benefits of Avocado

12/26/2016

I found the below article while searching for a blog topic for today. I have slightly edited​ for ease of reading. At the end there are some links to more articles as well.

12 Proven Health Benefits of Avocado (https://authoritynutrition.com/12-proven-benefits-of-avocado/​)
By Kris Gunnars, BSc
The avocado is a rather unique type of fruit. Most fruit consists primarily of carbohydrate, while avocado is high in healthy fats.
Here are 12 health benefits of avocado, that are supported by scientific research.

1. Avocado is Incredibly Nutritious
What we refer to as “avocado” is the fruit of the avocado tree, called Persea americana (1). These days, the avocado has become an incredibly popular food among health conscious individuals. It is often referred to as a superfood… which is not surprising given its health properties (2). There are many kinds of avocados, and the shape (from pear-shaped to round) and color (from green to black) can vary between them. They can also weigh anywhere from 8 ounces (220 grams) to 3 pounds (1.4 kg). The most popular type is called Hass avocado.
This is what a typical avocado looks like:
It is often called “alligator pear,” which is very descriptive because it tends to be shaped like a pear and have green, bumpy skin… like an alligator. The yellow-green flesh inside the fruit is eaten, but the skin and seed are discarded. Here are some of the most abundant nutrients, in a single 3.5 ounce (100 gram) serving (3):

  • Vitamin K: 26% of the RDA.
  • Folate: 20% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin C: 17% of the RDA.
  • Potassium: 14% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B5: 14% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B6: 13% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin E: 10% of the RDA.
  • Then it contains small amounts of Magnesium, Manganese, Copper, Iron, Zinc, Phosphorous, Vitamin A, B1 (Thiamine), B2 (Riboflavin) and B3 (Niacin).

This is coming with 160 calories, 2 grams of protein and 15 grams of healthy fats. Although it contains 9 grams of carbs, 7 of those are fiber so there are only 2 “net” carbs, making this a low-carb friendly plant food.
Avocados do not contain any cholesterol or sodium, and are low in saturated fat. I personally don’t think that matters, but this is one of the reasons they are favored by many “old school” experts who still believe these things are inherently harmful.

Bottom Line: Avocado is a green, pear-shaped fruit often called an “alligator pear.” It is loaded with healthy fats, fiber and various important nutrients.

2. They Contain More Potassium Than Bananas
Potassium is a nutrient that most people aren’t getting enough of (4). This nutrient helps maintain electrical gradients in the body’s cells and serves various important functions. Avocados are actually very high in potassium… with a 100 gram (3.5 ounce) serving containing 14% of the RDA, compared to 10% in bananas, which are a typical high potassium food (5). Several studies show that having a high potassium intake is linked to reduced blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure (6).

Bottom Line: Potassium is an important mineral that most people don’t get enough of. Avocados are very high in potassium, which should support healthy blood pressure levels.

3. Avocado is Loaded With Heart-Healthy Monounsaturated Fatty Acids

Again, avocado is a high fat food. In fact, 77% of the calories in it are from fat, making it one of the fattiest plant foods in existence. But they don’t just contain any fat… the majority of the fat in avocado is oleic acid. This is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is also the major component in olive oil and believed to be responsible for some of its beneficial effects. Oleic acid has been linked to reduced inflammation and been shown to have beneficial effects on genes linked to cancer (78910). The fats in avocado are also pretty resistant to heat-induced oxidation, making avocado oil a healthy and safe choice for cooking.

Bottom Line: Avocados and avocado oil are high in monounsaturated oleic acid, a “heart healthy” fatty acid that is believed to be one of the main reasons for the health benefits of olive oil.

4. Avocados Are Loaded With Fiber
Fiber is another nutrient found in relatively large amounts in avocado. Fiber is indigestible plant matter that can contribute to weight loss, reduce blood sugar spikes and is strongly linked to a lower risk of many diseases (111213). A distinction is often made between soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is known to be able to feed the friendly gut bacteria in the intestine, which are very important for the optimal function of our bodies (14). A 100 gram (3.5 ounce) serving of avocado contains 7 grams of fiber, which is 27% of the recommended daily amount. About 25% of the fiber in avocado is soluble, while 75% is insoluble (15).

Bottom Line: Avocados tend to be high in fiber, about 7% by weight, which is very high compared to most other foods. Fiber can have various important benefits for weight loss and metabolic health.

5. Eating Avocados Can Lower Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels
Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world (16). It is known that several blood markers are linked to an increased risk.
This includes cholesterol, triglycerides, inflammatory markers, blood pressure and various others. The effects of avocado on some of these risk factors has been studied in 8 human controlled trials. These studies have shown that avocados can (17181920212223):

  • Reduce total cholesterol levels significantly.
  • Reduce blood triglycerides by up to 20%.
  • Lower LDL cholesterol by up to 22%.
  • Increase HDL (the “good”) cholesterol by up to 11%.

One of the studies showed that including avocado in a low-fat vegetarian diet led to improvements in the cholesterol profile (24).
Unfortunately, all of the human studies were small (13-37 subjects) and short-term (1-4 weeks), but the results were impressive nonetheless.
Bottom Line: Numerous studies have shown that eating avocado can improve heart disease risk factors like Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, as well as blood triglycerides.
6. People Who Eat Avocados Tend to be Healthier
One study looked at the dietary habits and health of people who eat avocados. They analyzed data from 17,567 participants in the NHANES survey in the U.S. Avocado consumers were found to be much healthier than people who didn’t eat avocados. They had a much higher nutrient intake and were half as likely to have metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms that are a major risk factor for heart disease and diabetes (25). People who ate avocados regularly also weighed less, had a lower BMI and significantly less belly fat. They also had more HDL (the “good”) cholesterol. However… correlation does not imply causation and there is no guarantee that the avocados caused these people to be in better health. Therefore I don’t think this particular study carries much weight.

Bottom Line: One dietary survey found that people who ate avocados had a much higher nutrient intake and had a lower risk of metabolic syndrome.
7. The Fat in Them Can Help You Absorb Nutrients From Plant Foods
When it comes to nutrients, the total amount of them is not the only thing that matters. We also need to be able to absorb them… move them from the digestive tract and into the body, where they can be used. Some nutrients are “fat soluble,” meaning that they need to be combined with fat in order to be utilized. This includes vitamins A, D, E and K… along with antioxidants like carotenoids. One study showed that adding avocado or avocado oil to either salad or salsa can increase antioxidant absorption by 2.6 to 15-fold (26). So… not only is avocado highly nutritious, it can dramatically increase the nutrient value of other plant foods that you are eating. This is an excellent reason to always include a healthy fat source when you eat veggies. Without it, a lot of the beneficial plant nutrients will go to waste.

Bottom Line: Studies have shown that eating avocado or avocado oil with veggies can dramatically increase the amount of antioxidants you take in.
8. Avocados Are Loaded With Powerful Antioxidants That Can Protect The Eyes
Not only do avocados increase antioxidant absorption from other foods, they are also high in antioxidants themselves. This includes nutrients called Lutein and Zeaxanthin, which are incredibly important for eye health (2728). Studies show that these nutrients are linked to a drastically reduced risk of cataracts and macular degeneration, which are common in the elderly (2930). Therefore, eating avocados should have benefits for eye health over the long term.

Bottom Line: Avocados are high in antioxidants, including Lutein and Zeaxanthin. These nutrients are very important for eye health and lower the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.
9. Avocado May Help Prevent Cancer
There is limited evidence that avocado may be beneficial in preventing cancer. One study showed that it may help reduce side effects of chemotherapy in human lymphocytes (31). Avocado extract has also been shown to inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells (32). However, keep in mind that these studies were done in isolated cells and don’t really prove anything about what happens in a living, breathing human.

Bottom Line: Some studies in isolated cells have shown that nutrients in avocados may have benefits in preventing prostate cancer, and lowering side effects of chemotherapy in some cells.
10. Avocado Extract May Help Relieve Symptoms of Arthritis
Arthritis is a common problem in Western countries. There are many types of arthritis, and these are often chronic problems that people have for the rest of their lives. Multiple studies have shown that extracts from avocado and soybean oil, called Avocado and Soybean unsaponifiables, can reduce symptoms of arthritis of the bones, called osteoarthritis (3334). Whether avocados themselves can have this effect, and not just the extract, remains to be seen.

Bottom Line: Studies have shown that an extract from avocado and soybean oils can significantly reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis.
11. Eating Avocado May Help You Lose Weight
There is some evidence that avocados are a weight loss friendly food. In one study, people were split into groups. One group was instructed to eat a meal that contained avocado, the other a similar meal without avocado. Then they were asked a series of questions related to hunger and satiety.
The people eating the avocado felt 23% more satisfied and had a 28% lower desire to eat over the next 5 hours (35). If this holds true in the long-term, then including avocados in your diet could help you naturally eat fewer calories and have an easier time sticking to a healthy diet. Avocados are also high in fiber, and very low in carbs, two attributes that should also help promote weight loss, at least in the context of a healthy, real food based diet.
12. Avocado is Delicious and Easy to Incorporate in The Diet
Not only are avocados healthy, they’re also incredibly delicious and go with all sorts of foods. You can add them to salads and various sorts of recipes, or you can simply scoop them out with a spoon and eat them plain. They have a creamy, rich, fatty texture and blend well with various other ingredients. A notable mention is guacamole, which is arguably the most famous use of avocados. It includes avocado along with ingredients like salt, garlic, lime and a few others depending on the recipe. An avocado often takes some time to ripen and it should feel slightly soft when ripe. The nutrients in avocado can oxidize soon after fleshing it, but if you add lemon juice then that shouldn’t happen as quickly.
If you’re serious about adding avocado to your diet, then I highly recommend that you watch this video about how to pick, prepare and eat avocados. At the end of the day, avocados are an awesome food. They’re loaded with nutrients, many of which are lacking in the modern diet.
They are weight loss friendly, heart healthy and… last but not least, taste incredible.

What more could you ask for in a food?

Here are some links to other articles:
http://www.well-beingsecrets.com/health-benefits-of-avocado/
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=5
​https://draxe.com/avocado-benefits/

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Figure of the Week: Lord Soth

12/28/16

This is a vintage Ral Partha figure of Lord Soth from the Ravenloft campaign setting. He is wearing full plate mail with a plumed helm and cloak.

I painted him with traditional coloring, I tarnished him some to look battle-damaged and my husband flocked his base. When I find his mounted rider figure I will add it here.

Figure of the Week: Hoplite Warrior

This weeks figure is a fighter in hoplite style armor. It is human male wearing a breastplate over a chain shirt, feathered Corinthian helm, brigantine-like kilt, short sword, shield and wielding a short spear. It is an interesting figure, although not from a specific time period as the components don’t go together.

Not sure of the maker, I’m still researching the figure.

Tiki Goblin

Tiki Goblin (12 RP)
Small Humanoid (Goblinoid)

Racial Traits

  • Ability Score Racial Traits: Tiki Goblins are fast, but weak and unpleasant to be around. They gain +4 Dexterity, –2 Strength, and –2 Charisma. (2 RP)
  • Type: Tiki Goblins are humanoids with the goblinoid subtype. (0 RP)
    • Darkvision: Tiki Goblins see perfectly in the dark up to 60 feet. (2 RP)
  • Size: Tiki Goblins are Small creatures and thus gain a +1 size bonus to their AC, a +1 size bonus on attack rolls, a –1 penalty to their CMB and CMD, and a +4 size bonus on Stealth checks. (0 RP)
  • Fast Speed: Tiki  Goblins are fast for their size, and have a base speed of 30 feet. (1 RP)
  • Skilled: Tiki Goblins gain a +4 racial bonus on Ride and Stealth checks. (2 RP)
  • Tiki Shell: All Tiki Goblins are encased in a large coconut shell with magical properties. This gives them the ability to decorate it with tribal markings and gives them a +1 to Natural Armor. (1 RP)
  • Rope Runner: Tiki Goblins live on a city ship their whole lives. They learn to climb and rope-walk as soon as they can walk. This is natural to them. These goblins gain a +4 racial bonus on Acrobatics and Climb checks. (2 RP)
  • Swarming: Tiki Goblins are used to living and fighting communally with other members of their race. 1-4 Tiny and 2-4 Small members of this race can share the same square at the same time (they often stand on each other like a totem pole. If two members of this race that are occupying the same square attack the same foe, they are considered to be flanking that foe as if they were in two opposite squares. (2 RP)
  • Languages: Tiki Goblins begin play speaking Goblin. Bonus: Common, Badgen, Draconic, Dwarven, Gnome, Halfling, and Lutra. (0 RP)

Alternate Racial Traits

  • Eat Anything Raised with little or no proper food, many tiki goblins have learned to survive by eating whatever they happen across and can digest nearly anything without getting sick. Tiki Goblins with this trait gain a +4 on Survival checks to forage for food and a +4 racial bonus on saves versus effects that cause
  • Junk Tinker: Tiki Goblins use ramshackle equipment and vehicles that seem like they should never function. Tiki Goblins gain a +2 racial bonus on driving checks and on Craft checks to build or repair weapons or vehicles without the proper tools. They can make the attempt with any material that can hold the right shape for a few uses, but normally unfit materials produce items with the fragile quality. This racial trait alters skilled, replacing the racial bonus on Stealth checks. Source: PCS:ISR
  • Weapon Familiarity: Tiki Goblins’ traditional weapons are the harpoon and the blowgun, useful weapons on their home, the sea. Tiki Goblins with this trait are proficient with harpoon and blowgun, and treat any weapon with the word “goblin” in it as martial weapons. This racial trait replaces skilled.
  • Sea Scavenger Tiki Goblins survive by scavenging for sea flotsam, refuse and hunting other creatures. Goblins with this trait gain a +2 racial
  • bonus on Perception and Survival checks, and can use Survival to forage for food while on the sea. This racial trait replaces skilled.

Racial Feats
The following feats are available to a tiki goblin character who meets the prerequisites.

  • Ankle Biter
  • Battle Singer
  • Burn! Burn! Burn!
  • Dog Killer, Horse Hunter
  • Fire Hand
  • Fire Tamer
  • Flame Heart
  • Goblin Gunslinger
  • Letter Fury
  • Lead From the Back
  • Roll With It
  • Tangle Feet

These are sea goblins dressed in coconuts (like box trolls). They accessorize their shells with trophies from sea creatures; use spears, harpoons, nets and blowguns.
These goblins sail the sea on city ships with hundreds+ of inhabitants, capturing ships and raiding coastal cities.

New Year 2017

01/02/17

Happy New Year!! A little late this morning, but got sidetracked by household chores. There are many things I want to get done this year (or at least a start on). Some of the main ones are:

  • improving my garden/edible food forest
  • building an entertainment/grilling area
  • constructing a personal retreat building
  • improving out preparedness in all areas
  • better organizing the house
  • improving physical fitness

This is quite a few things to work on, but I can make plans or at least start on these projects. Below are a few files that will help me this year.

 

2017-Prepper-Planner
2017-Budget-Binder2017_

2017_Pinterest_Planner

preparedness baby stepsweeklypurchasingplan_origPreppers-University-January-To-Do (will download when you click link)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure of the Week: Turtle-Men

Today’s Figure is a pair of turtle-men. They are humanoid alligator snapping turtles wearing partial platemail (tasset, vambrace, neck and tail armor), wielding spiked clubs.

They were fun to paint. I really like anthropomorphic races. More research is needed to discover the manufacturing company.

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